The Social Stories #40

Ready, Steady, Spring!

The relaunch of social notebooking site Springpad, now Springpad 3.0 sees the 3m users platform come to life with a new look and functionality re-vamp. We think it may well be the next big thing and we’re not alone, with many commentators observing that it now combines the best of Pinterest with added functionality and utility. Edward Boches and co have developed the original platform so users can share and collaborate on notebooks as well as create communities around #tags. It’s  a much more social experience, but still with absolute user control on privacy. We can already imagine all kinds of applications such as collaborative recipe books for food brands, fashion designers sharing their moodboards and inspirations and even enterprise applications for teams to share notes, stimulus and references. Exciting stuff and more evidence of the strength of the interest graph.

 

The Best Laid Schemes

There’s been a lot of noise this week about Google + and the changes they’ve made to the design and functionality of their social platform. There’s been considerable debate over the success of the platform, but with Larry Page emphasising the service as Google’s “social spine” during yesterday’s Q1 earnings call and celebrating 170m users, it doesn’t seem to be going anywhere. As we highlighted in this post a few months back, Google + as a destination may not be the point. During all the hype however we caught wind of another exciting project started by a group of Googlers which got us excited. It’s called Schemer and the idea is to help people make the most of their free time. Users can create their own “schemes” and invite “accomplices” to join in with other members plans. Whether you use it to make plans with friends or help you find interesting thing to do we think they’re onto a winner!

 

You know what’s cool?

As The Social Network told us, one billion dollars… So, Facebook bought Instagram on Monday. While there was a wave of protest from Instagram’s passionately engaged community, more interesting perhaps is the analysis of what this purchase means for Facebook. Certainly it highlights some key preoccupations for the company going forward: 1. The primacy of the mobile experience and 2. The emerging importance of shared interests, rather than simply social connections. (That pesky interest graph again). Perhaps most significantly, it starts to hint at what the IPO might mean for Facebook, with investor pressure to grow and to neutralise the competition. Some interesting analysis can be found here and here and it’s certainly a development worth watching.

Leave a Reply